LED lighting

A diode may be a semiconductor that emits light once AN electrical current passes through it. it’s primarily the alternative of a solar cell (a device that converts light into electrical current). LED lighting square measure the most recent technology in energy economical lighting. junction rectifier stands for ‘Light Emitting Diode’, a semiconductor that converts electricity into lightweight.

Did You Know? there’s the same device to AN junction rectifier known as an IRED (Infrared Emitting Diode). rather than light, IRED devices emit IR energy once electrical current is run through them.

How Do LED Lights Work?

It’s really simple actually, and very cheap to produce…which is why there was so much excitement when LED lights were first invented!

The Technical Details: LED lights are composed of two types of semiconducting material (a p-type and an n-type). Both the p-type and n-type materials, also called extringent materials, have been doped (dipped into a substance called a “doping agent”) so as to slightly alter their electrical properties from their pure, unaltered, or “intrinsic” form (i-type).

The p-type and n-type materials are created by introducing the original material to atoms of another element. These new atoms replace some of the previously existing atoms and in so doing, alter the physical and chemical structure.

The p-type materials are created using elements (such as boron) that have less valence electrons than the intrinsic material (oftentimes silicon). The n-type materials are created using elements (such as phosphorus) that have more valence electrons that the intrinsic material (oftentimes silicon). The net effect is the creation of a p-n junction with interesting and useful properties for electronic applications. What those properties are exactly depends mostly on the external voltage applied to the circuit (if any) and the direction of current (i.e. which side, the p-type or the n-type, is connected to the positive terminal and which is connected to the negative terminal).

Application of the Technical Details to LED Lighting:

When an light-emitting diode (LED) has a voltage source connected with the positive side on the anode and the negative side on the cathode, current will flow (and light will be emitted, a condition known as forward bias).

If the positive and negative ends of the voltage source were inversely connected (positive to the cathode and negative to the anode), current would not flow (a condition known as reverse bias). Forward bias allows current to flow through the LED and in so doing, emits light. Reverse bias prevents current from flowing through the LED (at least up until a certain point where it is unable to keep the current at bay – known as the peak inverse voltage – a point that if reached, will irreversibly damage the device).

While all of this might sound incredibly technical, the important takeaway for consumers is that LEDs have changed the lighting landscape for the better, and the practical applications of this technology are almost limitless. To learn about why LEDs might be a good fit for your business, read here.

Benefits of LED Lighting

LED lighting boasts various benefits when compared to traditional solutions.

Energy-efficiency: LED bulbs are far more energy efficient when compared to the traditional alternatives with energy savings of 80-90% over incandescent or halogen technologies and up to 50% in comparison to fluorescent lamps.

Longer lifespan: LEDs last 2 or 3 times longer than fluorescent bulbs and over 50 times longer than incandescent lamps. The typical lifespan of an LED is up to 50,000 hours, further slashing replacement and maintenance costs.

Instant light: many fluorescent lights can take a while to ‘warm-up’ and reach their full brightness, however LEDs light up immediately.

Eco-friendly: LED technology has the potential to dramatically reduce carbon emissions as around 20% of the world’s electricity is used on lighting, so finding a more energy efficient solution will reduce this. Additionally, as LEDs don’t contain mercury, disposal of the bulbs is much easier and cleaner.

Lower heat output: unlike filament bulbs, an LED lamp does not project infrared heat in its beam, making them more suitable for lighting heat-sensitive items like artworks or food. As LEDs emit less heat they are also ‘safer’ than traditional bulbs, reducing the risk of fire caused by high temperature bulbs.

Added durability: LEDs are a solid state form of lighting, meaning they are able to withstand lower temperatures and higher levels of vibration and shock in comparison to incandescent or fluorescent lamps.

 For more details, contact us at info@razorlux.com .

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